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A list of all the posts and pages found on the site. For you robots out there is an XML version available for digesting as well.

Pages

Posts

Future Blog Post

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This post will show up by default. To disable scheduling of future posts, edit config.yml and set future: false.

Blog Post number 4

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This is a sample blog post. Lorem ipsum I can’t remember the rest of lorem ipsum and don’t have an internet connection right now. Testing testing testing this blog post. Blog posts are cool.

Blog Post number 3

less than 1 minute read

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Blog Post number 2

less than 1 minute read

Published:

This is a sample blog post. Lorem ipsum I can’t remember the rest of lorem ipsum and don’t have an internet connection right now. Testing testing testing this blog post. Blog posts are cool.

Blog Post number 1

less than 1 minute read

Published:

This is a sample blog post. Lorem ipsum I can’t remember the rest of lorem ipsum and don’t have an internet connection right now. Testing testing testing this blog post. Blog posts are cool.

portfolio

publications

Ironing Out Deficiencies: Evidence from the United States on the Economic Effects Iron Deficiency

Published in The Journal of Human Resources, 2015

In 1943, the United States government issued War Food Order No. 1, which required the fortification of bread with iron to reduce iron deficiency in the working age population during World War II. This paper measures the economic impact of the fortification program.

Recommended citation: Niemesh, Gregory. (2015). "Ironing Out Deficiencies: Evidence from the United States on the Economic Effects Iron Deficiency." The Journal of Human Resources. 50(4):910-958. http://jhr.uwpress.org/content/50/4/910?related-urls=yes&legid=wpjhr;50/4/910

Revisiting the Great Compression: Wage inequality in the United States, 1940-1960 (with Taylor Jaworski)

Published in Historical Methods, 2018

This paper takes advantage of the newly available complete count of the 1940 census as well as the enlarged (and improved) samples of the 1950 and 1960 censuses for the United States to revisit the seminal work of Goldin and Margo (1992) on the Great Compression in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Recommended citation: Jaworski, Taylor and Gregory Niemesh. (2018). "Revisiting the Great Compression: Wage inequality in the United States, 1940-1960" Historical Methods. 51(1):39-48. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01615440.2017.1393360

Improvements in Health and the Organization and Development of Health Care and Health Insurance Markets (with Melissa Thomasson)

Published in Handbook of Cliometrics, eds. Claude Diebolt and Michael Haupert. Berlin: Springer., 2018

Summary article in the Handbook of Cliometrics

Recommended citation: Gregory Niemesh and Melissa Thomasson. (2018). "Improvements in Health and the Organization and Development of Health Care and Health Insurance Markets." in Handbook of Cliometrics, eds. Claude Diebolt and Michael Haupert. Berlin: Springer.

Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early 20th Century United States (with Katherine Eriksson and Melissa Thomasson)

Published in Demography, 2018

In contrast to the recent experience, income inequality in the United States declined sharply around the middle of the twentieth century, an event that Goldin and Margo (1992) termed the “Great Compression.” Compared to the recent era of rising income inequality, our understanding of the earlier compression of wages is far less developed. In this paper, we exploit new data sources and empirical strategies to assess whether the rise of labor unions contributed substantially to the “Great Compression.” From the late 1930s to the early 1950s, union membership increased from approximately 11 to 30 percent of nonfarm employment. We adopt a difference-in-differences regression strategy to measure the association between changes in union density in the 1940s and changes in local inequality, conditional on other factors that may have simultaneously affected local wage structures. In essence, we test whether places with larger increases in union density tended to have larger declines in wage inequality. Therefore, isolating the role of unions, apart from the many other influences on the wage structure, poses difficult measurement challenges. Nonetheless, we find strong evidence that places that were “more exposed” to increases in unionization due to their pre-existing industrial structure experienced sharper declines in wage inequality during the 1940s, while controlling for several other factors such as the distribution of war contracts to local producers. This correlation extended at least until 1960, as did the “Great Compression.” Thus, the evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that unions caused a substantial amount of wage compression around mid-century.

Recommended citation: Eriksson, Katherine and Gregory Niemesh and Melissa Thomasson. (2018). "Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early 20th Century United States" Demography. 55(6): 2001-2024 http://niemesgt.github.io/files/ErikssonNiemeshThomasson.pdf

Unions and the Great Compression of American Inequality, 1940-1960 (with William Collins)

Published in Economic History Review, 2019

In this paper, we exploit new data sources and empirical strategies to assess whether the rise of labor unions contributed substantially to the “Great Compression.”

  • 2018 IPUMS USA Published Research Award Winner

Recommended citation: Collins, William and Gregory Niemesh. (2019). "Unions and the Great Compression of American Inequality, 1940-1960" Forthcoming at Economic History Review. http://niemesgt.github.io/files/CollinsNiemeshUnionsMarch2018.pdf

Medical Education Reforms and the Origins of the Rural Physician Shortage (with Carolyn Moehling, Melissa Thomasson, and Jaret Treber)

Published in Cliometrica, 2020

Using novel data from the American Medical Directories, we find that physicians trained in more rigorous programs with higher admission standards were less likely to set up practice in rural areas. These findings suggest that the medical education reforms of the early twentieth century contributed to the urban-rural disparity in access to physician care.

Recommended citation: Moehling, Carolyn, Gregory Niemesh, Melissa Thomasson, and Jaret Treber. (2020). "Medical Education Reforms and the Origins of the Rural Physician Shortage" Forthcoming at Cliometrica. http://niemesgt.github.io/files/MoehlingNiemeshThomassonTreber2019.pdf

talks

teaching

Teaching experience 1

Undergraduate course, University 1, Department, 2014

This is a description of a teaching experience. You can use markdown like any other post.

Teaching experience 2

Workshop, University 1, Department, 2015

This is a description of a teaching experience. You can use markdown like any other post.

workingpapers

Death in the Promised Land: the Great Migration and Black Infant Mortality, with Katherine Eriksson (UC-Davis)

Published:

The Great Migration of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North entailed a significant change in the health environment, particularly of infants, during a time when access to medical care and public health infrastructure became increasingly important. We create a new dataset that links individual infant death certificates to parental characteristics to assess the impact of migration by parents to Northern cities on infant mortality.

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Marriage and the Intergenerational Mobility of Women: Evidence from Marriage Certificates 1850-1910, with Katherine Eriksson and Jacqueline Craig

Published:

The literature finds a high degree of economic mobility for men in the 19th century in comparison to today. However, due to data limitations, changes in female economic mobility over time are not well understood. Using a set of marriage certificates from Massachusetts over the period of 1850-1910, we link men and women to their childhood and adult census records to obtain a measure of occupational standing across two generations. Intergenerational mobility for women is higher than for men during 1850-1880. Between 1880-1910, men’s mobility increases to converge with that of women. We also find evidence of assortative mating based on the correlation in occupational income score and real estate wealth between the husband’s and wife’s fathers.

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